Octopus a lagareiro

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Octopus Lagareiro is a typical culinary dish of Portugal. As the name implies, it is made with octopus. This is baked and then grilled. It is served warm drizzled with olive oil, which should have been browned garlic and small pieces of onion. As a follow up, the baked potatoes are used.

The expression lagareiro designates an individual who works in a mill in the production of olive oil. It is used in this context because of the abundant amount of oil that is used to water the octopus.

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Ingredients:

1 Octopus (was 2,780)
1 onion
small potatoes
salt
green peppers
Garlic Cloves
olive oil

Start by arranging the octopus, wash it well in hot running water and cutting it into pieces of two tentacles each. Then place it in a pan, along with a peeled onion, cut roughly in half moons, a little salt and a generous wire oil. Tapo and let cook slowly.
Once cooked, let cool slightly.
However, eight smash garlic cloves into the bottom of a baking sheet and gully them with olive oil, to cover the entire background. Disposal over the octopus pieces, properly drained of water and cook the onion, and sprinkle them with the remaining crushed garlic cloves. Rego plenty of olive oil and go to the oven to brown.
As for the potatoes, wash them thoroughly and place them in a baking dish. Sprinkles them liberally with salt (do not worry they are not salty) and take them to the oven on high heat, about an hour. You may want to move them halfway through cooking. In the end, cut up one by one onto a cutting board and gives to him a punch. It serves up simple, and each dish put oil or octopus sauce on top, according to taste. Accompany with a salad.
I suggest you put the potatoes in the oven before the octopus, since, being raw, take longer to cook.

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